Citroen C1, Peugeot 107, 108 & Toyota Aygo Owners Club. (Discount code for CityBugStore: C1OC)

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2019 1:44 am 
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Leaving the kitchen roll to soak up the oil overnight worked well, the bits I left in were saturated when I took them out earlier.

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It's pretty vital that you don't refit the cylinder head with any risidual oil in the bolt holes. I made that mistake on the first cast iron head I did; the bolts were barely hand tight when I checked them after the first heat cycle :shock:

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2019 11:12 am 
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That is clean, your well organised as well, which is a good thing and how I like it, that's why I bit slow working on our cars. Good info on the oil, I been using C3 spec oil in our 107 and 108 cars for last couple of years, so bodes well.

Luckily i never had to do a job like this cos never had problems with the actual main engine block or head on our cars, well apart from my sister's original Mini which spat a conrod :lol: many years ago, but even my dear old Dad who taught me a lot let the professionals fit new engine to that. My Dad wanted my sister to scrap it, but she loved it, so it lived on !

Done a bit of spannering and tinkering on various cars over the years all my problems been with the ancillary bits, brakes, suspension, exhausts, radiators etc., no major spannering on our 107 thankfully as it been so reliable, but as you say give it a go and be amazed on what you can achieve. Another draw back for me is our cars always been our main transport, so not had luxury of being able have it off the road for long periods of time.

Good luck with the rest of the build up.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2019 1:34 pm 
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Steve107 wrote:
That is clean, your well organised as well, which is a good thing and how I like it, that's why I bit slow working on our cars. Good info on the oil, I been using C3 spec oil in our 107 and 108 cars for last couple of years, so bodes well.

Luckily i never had to do a job like this cos never had problems with the actual main engine block or head on our cars, well apart from my sister's original Mini which spat a conrod :lol: many years ago, but even my dear old Dad who taught me a lot let the professionals fit new engine to that. My Dad wanted my sister to scrap it, but she loved it, so it lived on !

Done a bit of spannering and tinkering on various cars over the years all my problems been with the ancillary bits, brakes, suspension, exhausts, radiators etc., no major spannering on our 107 thankfully as it been so reliable, but as you say give it a go and be amazed on what you can achieve. Another draw back for me is our cars always been our main transport, so not had luxury of being able have it off the road for long periods of time.

Good luck with the rest of the build up.


Thanks Steve.

Yeah the progress here is glacial too :lol: Rome wasn't built in a day, as they say.
Though until this is finished I'm stranded here in the middle of the Pennines; food supplies are dwindling, my girlfriend is anything but pleased with public transport and I have a few jobs on hold so it's a bit of motivation to get up and crack on :thumbs:

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2019 9:22 pm 
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I received the socket earlier for the cylinder head bolts.

I went to loosen the first but it just didn't feel right..
The fitment seemed really poor and thankfully I decided to stop as it nearly stripped the bolt head :?

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At first I figured the poor fitment must be a manufacturing defect as the splines on the tool itself looked to be cut pretty badly from the factory.

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Well I did a bit more digging and it turns out the Toyota M9 spline is a double hex (12pt). The M9 splined socket I bought has ZXN triple square splines.

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TripleSq-vs-12Pt.jpg
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Good luck finding that distinction printed anywhere!
Most of the M9 bits sold as Toyota head bolt sockets that I looked at also appear to have ZXN triple square splines..
You could probably get away with it if it were a tight fitting socket - these KSTools bits seem anything but.

The only correct socket I could find with an M9 double hex profile (and how I discovered my error) is this one:
https://www.uktools.com/8-toyota-cylind ... ocket.html


Just when you think you've got it figured out life does a move on you and it's back to the drawing board.
What a noob :roll:


So whilst I'm waiting for the replacement I'm going to have a look at using a plastic storage box and a tin of engine degreaser as some kind of parts cleaner for the bits I've already pulled off the engine..

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2019 6:40 am 
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This is a very good comprehensive read!

Never actually had one of these engines apart so it good to see it all!

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 16, 2019 3:14 pm 
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wee mac wrote:
This is a very good comprehensive read!

Never actually had one of these engines apart so it good to see it all!

Thank you. Pretty aint it.




I can confirm the head bolt socket in that link fits very well, hurrah!
They were kind enough to make an exception and post it overnight too.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 16, 2019 4:27 pm 
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Whilst I was waiting for that socket to arrive I turned my attention to the inlet manifold...

With the cylinder head off the engine I'm planning to do some work to increase airflow - There's little benefit to be had from porting the cylinder head alone if the rest of the intake is causing a restriction futher upstream, so for this to perform well I'm treating the whole induction system as one piece.

This isn't exactly a standard procedure when refurbishing a cylinder head; it takes hours and hours of work and it should only be attempted after studying the topic obsessively.. it's therefore a bit beyond the scope of a stem seal change but it makes sense for me to do it now.
- I'll save the finer points for a future update in my Development Diary.

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The plastic moulding process creates ridges of excess material where 2 mouldings meet and sometimes those mouldings don't line up properly at all. This creates turbulance which can have a negative impact on airflow and overall performance, especially where a buildup of that excess material is effectively narrowing the ports.

My goal was simply to deburr the parts so they're performing to the maximum potential that the design intended. I also smoothed out some of the contours at the same time and did a bit of shaping in crucial areas.

The runners into the port needed deburring as this was restricting their diameter slightly and there was a step behind this ridge where the 2 mouldings meet.
This is a fast flowing section of pipe and turbulence here will affect how the air reaches the inlet valves.

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And then to the throttle body side; This is the choke point for the whole intake system so a little work here to smooth out the airflow should hopefully see an improvement.

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Last edited by Bunkey on Tue Nov 19, 2019 7:00 pm, edited 7 times in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 16, 2019 5:05 pm 
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Attachment:
TB port 1 web.jpg
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Attachment:
Throttle body web.jpg
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...With the ported throttle body attached.

See how the contours of the 2 parts blend into each other. The throttle body orifice (yeah I'm gonna call it that) on the manifold where the 2 parts meet was smaller in diameter than the bore of the throttle body itself. This creates a pronounced 1-2mm step when the parts are fitted together - There could well be a reason for this step (to create a slight low pressure area behind the throttle plate to encourage airflow for example) so instead of boring it out entirely parallel, matching the manifold diameter to the tb diameter, I blended the smaller bore on the manifold into the larger throttle body bore to improve airflow capacity but kept a gentle squeeze in the middle so I don't completely remove the benefits of having that step should there be any - You can see that radius better in the previous image with the TB removed.


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Intake Pipe Bellmouth 2 web.jpg
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...I replaced the air filter recently and went a size wider so I could shape a decent bellmouth into a silicon spacer at the mouth of the inlet pipe where the filter goes.


So with a similar treatment planned for the inlet ports in the head and the whole thing working together; this is how I'm improving airflow right through the induction system.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 16, 2019 7:02 pm 
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Good stuff, your reminding me of Mondeo V6 tinkering!, you could get a larger throttle body for that, but bit pointless cos to get the max out of it, like you mention, the inlet manifold hole was smaller so, you need to make that bigger etc. and it's manifold is metal. Ideally you needed the ST200 manifold, which was 'special' ported and it's larger throttle body, but to fit it wasn't easy plug n play, cos you needed special brackets and new throttle cable etc.

Although while investigating it I did see a few people improve their existing throttle body flow, by using flush screws and even shaving the shaft the butterfly attached to.

Then again I had an K&N induction kit fitted anyway, which improved things no end compared to standard airbox, and gave a nice noise!, so I was happy.

Keep up the good work, been enjoyable read all the way thru!


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 16, 2019 7:37 pm 
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Steve107 wrote:
Good stuff, your reminding me of Mondeo V6 tinkering!, you could get a larger throttle body for that, but bit pointless cos to get the max out of it, like you mention, the inlet manifold hole was smaller so, you need to make that bigger etc. and it's manifold is metal. Ideally you needed the ST200 manifold, which was 'special' ported and it's larger throttle body, but to fit it wasn't easy plug n play, cos you needed special brackets and new throttle cable etc.

Although while investigating it I did see a few people improve their existing throttle body flow, by using flush screws and even shaving the shaft the butterfly attached to.


Yeah blading the throttle plate works well too. I've employed a few of those tricks on this.

The plastic is easy to shape but you can only take away so much material with it being thin and it's hard to put a good finish on.

Attachment:
TB Port web.jpg
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