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 Post subject: Re: What do you say
PostPosted: Wed Jul 10, 2019 7:11 pm 
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office party vs. company event

Companies often organize parties so that the employees could get together and develop or maintain relations and generally have fun. I often come across 'office party' but that will work people working in offices only, right? What if there is a party for blue-collar workers? Do I need to say a 'company event' then? Say there is a company which produces furniture. The boss organizes a party for all the employees. Dinner, chatting a little bit of dancing. One employee asks another one "Tom, are you coming to ________ on Friday?" What would you use here?


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 Post subject: Re: What do you say
PostPosted: Wed Jul 10, 2019 10:57 pm 
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"the work (or works) party" is what I would say.

I'm not sure if "works" is like "the iron works" or if it meant to be the party belonging to the work and therefore needing an apostrophe (i.e. "the work's party")


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 Post subject: Re: What do you say
PostPosted: Thu Jul 11, 2019 8:27 am 
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Enjay wrote:
"the work (or works) party" is what I would say.

I agree, "office party" implies white collar (and could be equivalent to "department party" in some situations) whereas "works party" implies all who work for the organisation.

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 Post subject: Re: What do you say
PostPosted: Thu Jul 11, 2019 9:36 pm 
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Training at work vs. training in sport

When talking about a training session at work, I could use it as a noun and say: “One of the employees suddenly collapsed during the training.” Whereas in the world of sport, it is never a noun, it's a gerund so I could say: “One of the footballers suddenly collapsed while training.” Or, if I wanted to use a noun, I would have to say “One of the footballers suddenly collapsed during the training session.”
Am I right?


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 Post subject: Re: What do you say
PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2019 8:31 am 
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kaliope wrote:
Training at work vs. training in sport

When talking about a training session at work, I could use it as a noun and say: “One of the employees suddenly collapsed during the training.” Whereas in the world of sport, it is never a noun, it's a gerund so I could say: “One of the footballers suddenly collapsed while training.” Or, if I wanted to use a noun, I would have to say “One of the footballers suddenly collapsed during the training session.”
Am I right?

Sounds correct to me.

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 Post subject: Re: What do you say
PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2019 12:52 pm 
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And do all of these sound correct and natural?

A: Does your son do any sport?
B: Yeah, Tom does football training twice a week.
B: Yeah, Tom attends football training sessions twice a week.
B: Yeah, Tom goes to football training twice a week.
B: Yeah, Tom goes to football practice twice a week.


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 Post subject: Re: What do you say
PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2019 6:19 pm 
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kaliope wrote:
And do all of these sound correct and natural?

A: Does your son do any sport?
B: Yeah, Tom does football training twice a week.
B: Yeah, Tom attends football training sessions twice a week.
B: Yeah, Tom goes to football training twice a week.
B: Yeah, Tom goes to football practice twice a week.

I've heard all of those expressions used, and all seem OK to me.

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 Post subject: Re: What do you say
PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2019 1:24 pm 
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Say Bill and Mavis are going to the cinema. Before they leave their home, Mavis says to Bill: "Make sure you bring the tickets, Bill." Now, I'm not sure why 'bring' not 'take' is used there? They direction of the movement is away from the speaker and the listener. In such a case 'take' should be used, shouldn't it?

If they have already arrived at the cinema, I guess it then would be natural to use 'bring', like "Did you bring the tickets, Bill?" Can you explain? What if I used 'take' in the first example?


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 Post subject: Re: What do you say
PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2019 4:23 pm 
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kaliope wrote:
Say Bill and Mavis are going to the cinema. Before they leave their home, Mavis says to Bill: "Make sure you bring the tickets, Bill." Now, I'm not sure why 'bring' not 'take' is used there? They direction of the movement is away from the speaker and the listener. In such a case 'take' should be used, shouldn't it?

If they have already arrived at the cinema, I guess it then would be natural to use 'bring', like "Did you bring the tickets, Bill?" Can you explain? What if I used 'take' in the first example?

In the first example "take" suggests that Bill is going to the cinema but Mavis isn't ("take them with you" being implied) but "bring" suggests that Bill and Mavis are going to the cinema together ("bring them with us" being implied).

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 Post subject: Re: What do you say
PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2019 2:24 pm 
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Which of these work? Say I see some slogan on a plastic bag like the guy in the pic.

1. What does the bag say?
2. What does it say on the bag?
3. What does the bag read?
4. What does it read on the bag?
5. What is written on the bag?
6. What is printed on the bag?

Image


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