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 Post subject: Re: What do you say
PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2019 9:22 am 
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And, of course, the other main thing that Americans use "candy" for would be what we call "sweets" (or commonly sweeties, in this part of the UK anyway). Those would be any small confectionery item, including the small versions of bigger bars of chocolates as you might find in a packet of Heroes. However, offering "chocolate" for them would also still work.

And "cotton candy" to an American is "candy floss" in the UK, a "candy apple" in the US is a "toffee apple" here. Basically, "candy" is very, very, very American.


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 Post subject: Re: What do you say
PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2019 3:40 pm 
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Enjay wrote:
Basically, "candy" is very, very, very American.

+1

The only time I can think of that "candy" is used in BE is "candy floss" - oh and of course when referring to the white goods manufacturer :!: http://www.candy-domestic.co.uk/en_GB/

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 Post subject: Re: What do you say
PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2019 4:48 pm 
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I just watched a video on YT, where an American woman said to the learners of English to stop staying 'goodbye' as it sounded very serious. She said she could imagine only two situations when she would use it, that is, if she were angry and she said 'goodbye' slamming the door or if someone was leaving for a long time and perhaps she would never see that person again. Then she gave numerous examples of saying goodbye in everyday life like 'bye', 'see you later', see you next time etc. Do you agree with her? Or is it an AE/BE thing? Would I sound unnatural if said 'goodbye' to you guys after meeting you in a pub?

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Last edited by kaliope on Fri Jul 05, 2019 5:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: What do you say
PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2019 5:33 pm 
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IMHO that's another AmE/BE difference, I use "goodbye", "bye", "cheerio", "see you", and a few other expressions almost at random depending how I feel at that moment.

It's true that "goodbye" can sound rather more formal, but IMHO only an American could be offended in the way she obviously is.

It must be quite difficult for someone, like you, trying to learn English since much of the material on the internet is actually American and not English!

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 Post subject: Re: What do you say
PostPosted: Sun Jul 07, 2019 5:06 pm 
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There is an outrageous video on YT showing a traffic stop. It occurs the driver is a judge, furious that he's been pulled over. The judge gets out of the vehicle and says with a hectoring tone of voice: 'You'd better check the registration on this plate soon". Looks like the officer indeed becomes daunted after he's checked the tag, comes back to the driver and says "Have a good day, judge". The judge replies still angrily "You bet!" So what is the meaning here? Something like "I certainly will!" or "No doubt I will"? Do you use 'you bet!' or is it AE?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6n_SC5xgeA


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 Post subject: Re: What do you say
PostPosted: Sun Jul 07, 2019 5:47 pm 
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kaliope wrote:
There is an outrageous video on YT showing a traffic stop. It occurs the driver is a judge, furious that he's been pulled over. The judge gets out of the vehicle and says with a hectoring tone of voice: 'You'd better check the registration on this plate soon". Looks like the officer indeed becomes daunted after he's checked the tag, comes back to the driver and says "Have a good day, judge". The judge replies still angrily "You bet!" So what is the meaning here? Something like "I certainly will!" or "No doubt I will"? Do you use 'you bet!' or is it AE?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6n_SC5xgeA

In this context "You bet!" is used ironically, suggesting that the judge will have a good day but will speak to people he knows to ensure that the Police officer does not have a good day.

It's slightly confusing as judges do not have any special privileges and have to abide by all the laws - so telling the Police officer to check his number plate is IMHO irrelevant? It almost seems as this YT video is not real life but created by someone who doesn't understand that judges have no privileges to break laws?

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 Post subject: Re: What do you say
PostPosted: Sun Jul 07, 2019 6:30 pm 
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Here in Poland judges are extra protected, e.g., they can't be written a ticket for any traffic misdemeanour. I know it's sick but looks like they feel they're above the law in many countries. Anyway, do you use "you bet!"? In what situations?


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 Post subject: Re: What do you say
PostPosted: Mon Jul 08, 2019 1:22 am 
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Back to the goodbye thing, as ever I agree with Dave. I certainly would not be offended by a friendly "goodbye" at the end of a work day or when someone was leaving my house/party/whatever.

I am also likely to use "bye", "good night", "ciao", "au revoir", "see you later (alligator)", even "farewell" or "see you anon" and so on depending on mood, context and who I am speaking to.

I could also probably make many of them sound angry or sarcastic if I wanted to. That's certainly not unique to "goodbye". In fact, a terse and harshly delivered "bye" could easily be worse than a "goodbye". I mean, I couldn't even be bothered to give the other person the time needed to utter two syllables. ;)


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 Post subject: Re: What do you say
PostPosted: Mon Jul 08, 2019 1:27 am 
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As for "you bet", it's not really a phrase I use often (I feel it might be a bit American-ish, but not uncommon in the UK) but I would usually use it when I am genuinely enthusiastic about something and it's probably already pretty obvious that I am going to do the thing in question.

Person 1: "It's Friday, are you looking forward to your days off."

Person 2: "You bet."


I guess, a lot of the time, I'd use it as a more polite version of the idioms "does a bear sh*t in the woods" or "is the pope a Catholic" (not that the second one is particularly impolite). i.e. the thing being asked about is so likely it's almost inevitable.


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 Post subject: Re: What do you say
PostPosted: Mon Jul 08, 2019 4:03 pm 
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Enjay wrote:
As for "you bet", it's not really a phrase I use often (I feel it might be a bit American-ish, but not uncommon in the UK) but I would usually use it when I am genuinely enthusiastic about something and it's probably already pretty obvious that I am going to do the thing in question.

Person 1: "It's Friday, are you looking forward to your days off."

Person 2: "You bet."


I guess, a lot of the time, I'd use it as a more polite version of the idioms "does a bear sh*t in the woods" or "is the pope a Catholic" (not that the second one is particularly impolite). i.e. the thing being asked about is so likely it's almost inevitable.

I agree with all that.

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