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What do you say
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Author:  Enjay [ Tue Jun 25, 2019 9:46 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: What do you say

Yes, if you were speaking in that tense it would be fine I think. However, I think that I would default to the "when I walk the dog, my wife watches TV" form as a more usual way to say it.

Author:  kaliope [ Wed Jun 26, 2019 8:51 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: What do you say

Do these mean the same and are all natural?

-Didn't it occur to you to call the police?
-Didn't it cross your mind to call the police?
-Didn't it spring to your mind to call the police?

Author:  PetrolDave [ Thu Jun 27, 2019 8:52 am ]
Post subject:  Re: What do you say

kaliope wrote:
Do these mean the same and are all natural?

-Didn't it occur to you to call the police?
-Didn't it cross your mind to call the police?
-Didn't it spring to your mind to call the police?

I've heard all of those used over the years, personally I would probably use either of the first two as the third could come across as being slightly sarcastic.

Author:  Enjay [ Thu Jun 27, 2019 12:08 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: What do you say

Agreed. :)

Author:  kaliope [ Fri Jun 28, 2019 5:21 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: What do you say

I hear lots of "going to's" in American movies and was wondering if this phrase is perhaps much more used in AE than in BrE, is it? Here are some examples that I came across recently; now, wouldn't perhaps a BrE speaker rather use the future tense in them?

-Roll the window down or I’m going to have to break it. vs. I'll have to
-I don’t think I’m going to have time. I’m busy. vs. I'll have to
-Sorry, I’m not going to be able to do this for you. vs. I won't be able
-Before I enter the park, I’m going to need to buy a ticket. vs. I'll need to

Author:  PetrolDave [ Sat Jun 29, 2019 8:38 am ]
Post subject:  Re: What do you say

kaliope wrote:
I hear lots of "going to's" in American movies and was wondering if this phrase is perhaps much more used in AE than in BrE, is it? Here are some examples that I came across recently; now, wouldn't perhaps a BrE speaker rather use the future tense in them?

-Roll the window down or I’m going to have to break it. vs. I'll have to
-I don’t think I’m going to have time. I’m busy. vs. I'll have to
-Sorry, I’m not going to be able to do this for you. vs. I won't be able
-Before I enter the park, I’m going to need to buy a ticket. vs. I'll need to

It depends on the person - some who are more verbose will use the "going to" form, others who like to keep things "short and sweet" won't.

So much of AmE usage has come into BrE usage, especially among younger people, that it's often a generation thing rather than a Uk vs. US thing. I think a large factor is the insistence by Microsoft on allowing American English spellings even when you select British English.

Author:  Enjay [ Sat Jun 29, 2019 11:44 am ]
Post subject:  Re: What do you say

I don't know, because I'm not American, but it does seem more like a personal habit/choice thing as much as anything else.

I certainly use both the longer and shorter forms. I *think* that I probably use the shorter forms most of the time but, perhaps, during times of emphasis or when deliberately speaking more slowly or trying to be clear, I might use the longer forms. I'm sure there are many exceptions and I'm sure that I often use both reasonably interchangeably.

Author:  kaliope [ Sat Jun 29, 2019 6:12 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: What do you say

Do you find all of them correct? Can a car sit or stand?

-This car has been parked here for two months. Do you know whose it is?
-This car has been sitting here for two months. Do you know whose it is?
-This car has been standing here for two months. Do you know whose it is?

Author:  PetrolDave [ Sun Jun 30, 2019 8:12 am ]
Post subject:  Re: What do you say

kaliope wrote:
Do you find all of them correct? Can a car sit or stand?

-This car has been parked here for two months. Do you know whose it is?
-This car has been sitting here for two months. Do you know whose it is?
-This car has been standing here for two months. Do you know whose it is?

All are correct IMHO.

Cars have in the past often been referred to as "she" (to explain why would not be PC) so attributing to them the ability to sit or stand is in common usage.

"Sit" is used because the vehicle is motionless, "stand" is used because the body is clear of the road.

Author:  kaliope [ Mon Jul 01, 2019 10:15 am ]
Post subject:  Re: What do you say

make it vs. come

1. Are these two equally natural?

"Let me know if you will be able to make it to the office party."
"Let me know if you will be able to come to the office party"

2. Does 'make it' work in the past?
A: I didn't you see at the party last night.
B: Sorry, I couldn't make it. vs. Sorry, I couldn't come.

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