Citroen C1, Peugeot 107, 108 & Toyota Aygo Owners Club. (Discount code for CityBugStore: C1OC)

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PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2016 9:05 pm 
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Location: Aberdeenshire
Drives: C1 2012; 107 2009
As far as I know, most bugs do not come with a glove box cover and the space below the airbag and above the footwell on the passenger side has a small shelf. However, with a reasonably cheap and easy to fit mod using OEM parts, the shelf can be converted to a glove box by simply adding a door/lid. This, in my opinion, makes the interior of the car look much nicer and also means that there is a easy access closable area for you to tuck small items away out of sight.

There are two styles of glove box lid available and the relative merits of these have been discussed a few times on the forum. The purpose of this product review is to compare and contrast the two styles of lid. Both lid types are available in the grey of the original bug interiors and also in black to match the interior of the cars made nearer the end of the run of the Mk1 body type.

Description / Identification:
The two types are most readily recognised by the shape of the handle.

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The Citroen (and Peugeot I assume) product has a small, curved handle reminiscent of the shape of the exterior door handles.

The Toyota product has a large, rectangular handle matching the style of the interior door pulls on all bug models.

What's in the kit:

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The Toyota one comes with a lid, two retaining clips for the hinge, two self tapping screws and a cord strap (to stop the lid opening too far) already attached to the lid at one end. Neither Toyota one that I have bought came with instructions but it was easy to work out what to do.

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The Citroen one comes with two large self tapping screws and a smaller one. It also comes with a retaining strap. This time it's a plastic one that hooks on to the lid at one end. The Citroen kit contained instructions but there is more need for it to do so (see fitting below).

Price and Availability:
Prices can vary quite a bit but a typical good price for any of these lids is around £25. The black version of the Citroen type seems to tend to be a bit pricier (around £30-35) but can still be found for around £25-30 as well. So, there isn't much to separate them on price.

A quick google search will find plenty of listings and a number of ebay sellers stock them.

General appearance:

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This is mostly a personal preference thing. I initially bought a Citroen type because I liked the look of the smaller handle and the fact that it matched the exterior door handles. However, I had a Homer Simpson "Doh!" moment when I realised, of course, that matching an exterior feature was pretty irrelevant inside the car where nothing is that shape. Personally, I think I do still prefer the appearance of the smaller, rounder handles but it's not a strong preference.

The "grain" pattern on the lid surface is slightly different between the two black ones that I have. The Citroen one is a close match to the pattern on the similarly patterned bits of interior trim in my C1 but the Toyota one has a slightly shallower pattern making it not quite such a close match. I have compared them to my son's grey Toyota one in his 107 and the difference in colour is enough for me not really to be able to tell whether his one is the same. Once in place, if you are looking for the difference you might spot it but it's very minimal. I didn't notice it until I had two lids sitting side by side.

I don't know if there actually is a difference in grain/pattern depth between the Citroen/Peugeot/Toyota vehicles or if this is merely a difference in how these particular lids were manufactured. Anyway, if that is something that you feel might be important to you, it might make sense to get a Toyota lid for an Aygo and a Citroen one for the French models.

As an additional note, both handles are made of a type of plastic (PVC?) that won't take paint well. If you have colour-coded your interior trim I think you'll find it hard to get paint to stay on either handle type.

Features:
Not much to say here. They are both doors. The only real difference feature-wise is that the Citroen one has a circular dent on the back for sitting a can or something on whereas the Toyota one does not (but let's not forget that the car has two cup holders in the centre console too). Both feature a a business card and pen holder recess on the back with the pen holder clip being part of the back moulding for the whole door in the Toyota one and a separate screwed on clip on the Citroen one.

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General build:
Neither lid is exactly what I would call a luxury item but they are both consistent with the quality of trim in the cars. If I had to pick one that felt better built, I'd probably go for the Toyota one but there isn't much in it. I'm just talking about the actual build of the lid here. I'll talk about the handles, functionality and hinges later.

Fitting:
There is quite a difference in how the two lids are fitted. The Citroen one came with instructions, neither of the Toyota ones I have bought did. However, the Citroen one probably does need more in the way of instructions.

The Toyota one has two cylindrical hinge pivots that clip on to the top edge of the footwell shelf. Once clipped on, it holds reasonably well in place on its own, allowing you to put a small retaining clip over each cylinder and then screw them into place using the self tapping screws provided. There are already mouldings and holes on the car to put the clips on and screw into. It's a little fiddly but not difficult. A short screwdriver is best. The cord retaining strap has a plastic clip on the end and it simply pushes in to a hole in the upper part of the dash. The hole looks very similar to the one that the tongue/latch of the lid lock fits into.

The Citroen one has a different type of hinge. The bottom edge of the lid has a long, creased lip with two holes in it. You place the lip along the top edge of the shelf and then place the larger self tapping screws through the holes in the lip and through into the same holes as the clips on the Toyota version screwed on to. This is slightly fiddlier because the lid doesn't hold itself in place until the screws are in the holes but it's not difficult by any means. Then there is the plastic retaining strap. The Citroen strap needs to have a hole drilled for it and there are no marks on the car to indicate where to put it. That's why (I assume) the Citroen one comes with instructions that give you measurements for the hole placement. However, even without measurements, it would be reasonably easy to work out roughly where the hole should go. Depending on the size of your drill, making the hole could be a little tricky (a small cordless would be easy, my chunky Bosch corded one was less so) and some people have reported that they also found screwing the strap on fiddly. I found it OK but the strap did tend to keep dropping off the at the lid end until everything was secure. The bottom end is just held on to the lid by placing the slot-shaped hole over a T-shaped lug. Once the strap has been turned slightly, the slot and lug no longer line up so the strap shouldn't drop off once everything is in place.

Functionality:
I'll state at the outset, I feel that the Toyota one is better for a number of reasons.

The hinges.
As stated above the Toyota one has little cylindrical bits that slot into the top edge of the shelf and which are retained by complementary-shaped screw-on clips. When you open the lid, the cylinders rotate in their seatings. In other words, they are a proper hinge and they work reasonably freely. The Citroen hinge is made of a creased lip along the bottom of the lid. When the lid opens/closes, the lip flexes along the crease. When it's new, the crease is not very flexible. I suspect that it will loosen off given enough time and usage (and maybe in warm weather) but that does mean that the plastic is weakening. Its action is definitely not as hinge-like and free-moving as the Toyota lid.

The handles/retaining mechanism.
As well as being visually very different, the handles operate quite differently across the two lid styles too. The big rectangular Toyota handle slides downwards to pull the latch down out of the hole in the upper dash allowing the lid to open and returns with a spring loaded action.

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The smaller Citroen handle pulls outwards and pivots to pull the latch down out of the hole (and also returns with a spring loaded action).

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I found that the Toyota action felt more solid. Neither lid is made of particularly high quality material but the slightly soft feeling plastic that the handle is made of meant that I could feel the Citroen one flex slightly when I pulled on it.

More importantly, I found that the closing worked better with the Toyota handle. With the Toyota one, you close the lid and allow the handle to spring upwards into the retaining slot. Sometimes it requires a small upwards push but, basically, it locates and holds well. The Citroen one doesn't just slide, it pivots (as mentioned above). Particularly with the tighter hinge mechanism, I found that I usually had to close the lid and then press the front of the handle to ensure that it was sitting in place properly. If it wasn't, again because of the pivoting, the handle would stick out a bit and look odd.

Retaining strap:
The Toyota one is a piece of cord that just flops back inside when the lid is closed. However, because it is just a piece of floppy cord, it can sometimes flop in such a way that it doesn't go inside but gets left poking out the side of the lid.

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The Citroen strap is a piece of flexible plastic that screws on to a newly created hole in the car. It is in a better position for avoiding getting caught in the lid but the fact that it is a single piece of solid (albeit flexible) plastic means that it does offer some resistance to the movement of the lid and doesn't straighten out properly. I found (in combination with the folded-crease hinge) that (particularly on cold days) the lid would sit at an "almost fully open" angle rather than just flopping open completely. Not a big issue, but it's there. I also have a nagging feeling that it's just a matter of time until it breaks.

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I suppose, unless you are likely to be putting much strain on the lid (sitting heavy things on it or pushing it too far open) the straps could be omitted from either model if you didn't want to fit them.

Long term:
I can't really comment on how the lids last (our oldest one is about 8 months old) but I have seen people say that the lids can warp if exposed to hot temperatures for a long period of time. I don't know if this is related to one type of lid or all the lids in general. I'd appreciate any comments on that.

Conclusion:
Both lids make (IMO) a significant improvement to the appearance of the interior of the car and provide some useful functionality. Which one looks best really is a matter of personal preference and there is little to separate them on price. I would suggest that the quality of the two lid types themselves are similar but the hinge, handle mechanism and closing mechanism of the Toyota is quite a bit better than that of the Citroen one. The Toyota one is also easier to fit (though neither pare particularly difficult) and doesn't involve drilling a hole to secure the retaining strap.


And finally, the latch clip.
There is an item which is pretty optional for either of the lid types, but it's worth mentioning here. Usually costing less than £2 and easy to find on ebay the clip pushes into the central hole in the upper dash where the lid latch goes in to. Its purpose is to make the hole a closer fit for the size and shape of the latch and thereby give the lid a tighter seating when it is shut. We fitted one in my son's 107 with his Toyota lid and it did reduce a minimal looseness/rattle that the lid sometimes had. I used one with my C1 when I fitted the Citroen lid to it. However, in combination with the stiff hinge and pivoting handle mechanism it made the latch slot tight enough that the handle would stick out quite far in a "semi-pulled out" position, even after pushing the handle home when closing the lid; so I took it out again. When I put the Toyota lid in, I put the clip back. However, like I said, it really is optional but seeing as how I had one and it is meant to be there, I thought that I may as well put it in.

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Well, there you go. Far too much information about glove box lids for... well, anyone really. Sorry about the quality of the pictures. The battery in my camera was flat and my phone has a rubbish camera. Also, the weather was changeable so sometimes it used flash and sometimes it didn't.


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PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2016 9:34 pm 
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Drives: 2012 Aygo Fire 5dr.
Most in depth review there could possibly be but I agree. The Toyota lid is more robust from experience. My 107 Urban Move came with the Peugeot lid but it would spring open over harsh bumps. Took it to the dealer as the mechanism had been bodged, then they lost the plastic strap and denied all knowledge of it and said I never bought it in. Bought a Toyota one to replace it and never looked back. Got another Toyota one for my Aygo in black and still goes strong.

Man I need something better to do on my Saturday nights xD

Sent from my E2303 using Tapatalk


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PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2016 10:31 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2012 12:55 am
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Location: S East
Drives: was VTR 2009
Agree too. I bought a Citroen lid when I got my bug, it was ok but not built very well. I had an oppurtunity to sell the Citroen one and I was happy enough to - it meant I could buyp a Toyota lid. Much nicer, fits nicer, looks nicer, no trouble fitting it and it stays closed.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2019 5:04 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2019 7:10 pm
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Drives: Peugeot 107
This review was so useful and I am so glad I saw it before rushing into buying the Citroen one, I got the Toyota instead and love it!

Do they still sell the latch clips? If so could you link me to one? Thanks!!

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2011 Peugeot 107


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2019 6:58 pm 
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Joined: Fri Aug 28, 2015 10:59 pm
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Location: Aberdeenshire
Drives: C1 2012; 107 2009
No problem. I'm pretty sure this is the right one.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/NEW-GENUINE- ... ctupt=true


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 08, 2019 9:30 am 
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Joined: Tue May 14, 2019 2:47 pm
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Drives: 2014 Peugeot 107
WOW! Every single question I had about the glove box lids is answered here. Thanks Enjay! This is super work!

Now, it's just about getting one shipped to South Africa. Can't wait to install it.


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