Citroen C1, Peugeot 107, 108 & Toyota Aygo Owners Club. (Discount code for CityBugStore: C1OC)

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 16, 2019 9:48 pm 
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Posts: 13
Drives: C1 2007
Cookeh! I thought I recognised your name from the Volvo forum (LPTJoe with the 940 turbo). Good to see another Volvo head on here, even if it is one of the lesser/non-proper/modern front wheel drive models :)

The bug looks ok to me, you've spent a long time cleaning it for a car you claim to dislike so much, you could have sold it and replaced it with something that offers similar economy at any point too but haven't?

I'm not convinced... The lady doth protest too much ;)


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 8:59 pm 
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Drives: 2006 Pug 107 1.0
You're right, it is inferior to the proper-wheel drive 7s and 9s. Had both Turbos of both before though, never the 850 so had to give it a go - that's the excuse ;) I've spent a total of 4 hours on it over 3 weeks, less than £10 in materials, not exactly much time or effort really; as you can tell from the Volvo forum I'm quite particular about having my cars in a clean and tidy state! Don't think I have a post on there that doesn't feature something getting cleaned haha.

Regarding selling it and replacing it, it's not worth much in its current condition - due to those pesky boot leaks, the paint damages, incomplete service history (especially the last 20k miles). If I were to sell it I would have a very very poor selection of cars that could be bought with the sale money, most of them would be from the same market segment and have the same flaws. From Autotrader searches in its current condition and mileage I'd be lucky to get £500 for it. All in all it wouldn't make much sense to trade to a car I don't know anything about, potentially have to invest boatloads in it to get it to a good roadworthy state, and still have the same issues with refinement and road handling! At least this car is known to me and I know that for the most part it has been at least mechanically well looked after for the last 8 years.

I am considering selling it when it is tidied up and swapping for something that is at the very least the next market segment up or better still a car actually suited to mega-motorway miles but due to the whole exercise of trying to save money in the first place that's just not going to happen in the immediate future. Honestly the reason I took this car on in the first place was because almost £5k a year in fuel and an additional £2k in bringing the Project 850 up to task was having a significant impact on my very limited student wages - not in a position to invest further into another car or indeed have a car with poorer fuel economy as doubling the fuel economy is the only way to still make a meaningful saving after insurance costs are covered.

RainerK wrote:
Hello,
I saw your picture of the rear arch and it looks as if there is a big difference to my car.
My car has a bolt in the hole and I could not see this bolt in your picture. This lt seems quite important.


It's there, check the before picture. It's just the lighting in the after picture that masks the detail of the bolt head and makes it look like a hole.

Enjay wrote:
Now that I'm looking at it on my PC instead of my phone, I can see the contaminant better. It does indeed look like it might be fence preservative overspray.


Its getting there but still needs lots of work. Especially if I aim to get it into a saleable condition anytime in the near future. Fence overspray is indeed a possibility, though sister only ever painted fences chalk grey so its an odd one. Will try some thinners on it and see what happens.

107MC wrote:
Im not sure how i feel about this thread. I might just be being 'triggered' but like.....as a fellow 107 owner (for past 9 years).....(whos car in places is probably in poorer condition than yours)....i dont like it when people say they're rubbish....'cos theyre not!

(Also, just catching up thread in more detail, the bulb can be changed without removing the battery. It's a biatch to access yes..but it can be done)

Dont see many yellow ones either. Embrace it!!!!


Really depends on what you want from a car to be honest. For a dirt cheap city runaround where you want it to just start, be easy to park, and hustle you around the city there is nothing wrong with it. It's major flaws only become apparent when you start looking at it from a more enthusiastic point of view or when applying it to 'normal' driving scenarios that it was not specifically designed for - like motorways.

From a more enthusiastic point of view that translates to things like the engine not being particularly wanting to use the full rev range; or the ludicrous body roll even at low speeds that sap confidence - aided by a complete lack of feedback from the horribly over-assisted steering so you don't really know when you're approaching the limits of grip instead only feeling the loss of grip and so inevitable understeer. The sloppy vague gearchange with its massive throw doesn't exactly encourage you to race through the gears either - not that there is much point when the ratios are so similar that 2-4 might as well be the same gear. Then there is the clutch - I understand this can be improved by upgrading it to the 190mm disc from a Yaris but from factory it is pathetic.

From normal usage point of view it is so lacking in refinement that really anything about 60mph is agonising and I actually detest the idea of taking this thing on the motorway for more than an hour. This isn't helped by the fact that the limited adjustability on seat and wheel position (with no adjustment on height of the chair or reach or the wheel) makes it rather challenging to get a comfortable seating position. The built in and non-adjustable headrests force you into a slouched position with rounded shoulders and a neck that is thrust forward. Whilst fine for short periods really starts to grate on slightly longer trips, which all mine are. Lastly the ride, for a car designed for driving around cities riddled with speed bumps and potholes it is atrocious, rock solid with no damping.

I do personally believe that all "modern" cars should really be able to be used comfortably and without causing physical or aural discomfort across all normal types of driving, regardless of their specific market segment, with normal types being defined as both city driving, stop start traffic, and longer motorway trips at the speed limit of 70mph. The fact that this car cannot do that, and the fact that it offers such a poor drive out of the city when stock is why I believe it is a rubbish car. Though, as I have said, for its intended purpose of short city based trips it does perform perfectly well, and its fuel returns are very, very impressive.

Now, I also acknowledge that there are a range of easy and cheap mods that would solve most of these issues, such as upgrading to 6J alloys and wider 185 profile tyres, some new suspension (B4s and eibach springs for example), a decent front arb, and a good bit of acoustic treatment but that's not going to happen in this car as its sole purpose is to save money, and its also no use for Joe Bloggs with no interest or inclination in mods.

I will say that the colour is at least something different in a sea of white, silver and grey - so I do embrace that part at least!

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2006 Peugeot 107 1.0 (Soon to be daily!)


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 10:58 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 22, 2015 5:02 pm
Posts: 82
Drives: 2007 107 Urban 5dr
Thanks for your really detailed response.

I agree in part.

But not all.

I think I've probably let a bit of sentimentality get in the way.

Having said that though, I've always worked in the motor trade and have driven all kinds of different cars, new old, huge, tiny etc. When my girlfriend got the 107, I worked at Ford and to drive, a Ka for example was in another league for ride and handling balance and steering etc. To compare, the 107 was as you described to drive.
However....when you drive other cars of this size and type...you (or at least i) come to realise these aren't bad at all!
I agree on the ride which is a bit too jittery around town or on poor roads..but that does give it a stable feel at higher speeds. Also the steering is decent! Again comparing to really good systems it's not great but it's one of the better feeling ones.

Anyway. What am I saying, this is your thread and we are all entitled to our opinions. You have done a great job so far and I'll keep checking up.
Just no more slagging off please! From what I gather, It's a free car to get you out of a hole....so enjoy it!


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2019 10:21 am 
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Cookeh wrote:
From a more enthusiastic point of view that translates to things like the engine not being particularly wanting to use the full rev range; or the ludicrous body roll even at low speeds that sap confidence - aided by a complete lack of feedback from the horribly over-assisted steering so you don't really know when you're approaching the limits of grip instead only feeling the loss of grip and so inevitable understeer. The sloppy vague gearchange with its massive throw doesn't exactly encourage you to race through the gears either - not that there is much point when the ratios are so similar that 2-4 might as well be the same gear. Then there is the clutch - I understand this can be improved by upgrading it to the 190mm disc from a Yaris but from factory it is pathetic.

From normal usage point of view it is so lacking in refinement that really anything about 60mph is agonising and I actually detest the idea of taking this thing on the motorway for more than an hour. This isn't helped by the fact that the limited adjustability on seat and wheel position (with no adjustment on height of the chair or reach or the wheel) makes it rather challenging to get a comfortable seating position. The built in and non-adjustable headrests force you into a slouched position with rounded shoulders and a neck that is thrust forward. Whilst fine for short periods really starts to grate on slightly longer trips, which all mine are. Lastly the ride, for a car designed for driving around cities riddled with speed bumps and potholes it is atrocious, rock solid with no damping.

I've owned many small cars in my earlier years including 2 real Minis. The 107/C1/Aygo shares many things in common with them including several you mention - such as engine not wanting to fully rev (but a K&N filter helps a lot), strange seating position and rock hard ride (I drive my C1 just like I drove my Minis - avoid every pothole you can).
The body roll is IMHO typically French, and the very light steering is actually what most car drivers nowadays want (when I worked at Lotus we resisted putting power steering on until it became a major factor in losing sales).

I guess it all depends on your perspective - I like it's retro driving style, the upside of this being you can get to the limits at low speeds and so it's a good training before you move on to more performance orientated vehicles (I've gone the opposite way so I use it to make sure my skills don't get rusty through misuse).

Each to their own though :D

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2015 Skoda Octavia 1.4TSI Elegance estate


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2019 10:15 pm 
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Drives: 2006 Pug 107 1.0
107MC wrote:
Thanks for your really detailed response.

I agree in part.

But not all.

I think I've probably let a bit of sentimentality get in the way.

Having said that though, I've always worked in the motor trade and have driven all kinds of different cars, new old, huge, tiny etc. When my girlfriend got the 107, I worked at Ford and to drive, a Ka for example was in another league for ride and handling balance and steering etc. To compare, the 107 was as you described to drive.
However....when you drive other cars of this size and type...you (or at least i) come to realise these aren't bad at all!


My pleasure, I'm a huge car fan and sincerely enjoy discussing them at length haha! Interesting regarding the Ka, because it is the same market segment as the 107. Unfortunately I don't have much to compare the 107 to segment wise, the smallest car I've driven was an R50 Mini Cooper. Obviously that's a fair bit bigger indeed, and definitely acted like it refinement wise - wasn't too bad a drive either once I junked the runflats, pretty decent steering and clutch in those. Next smallest after that is the old Corolla that I adored, then an IS200, and then we're into Volvo estates! Naturally I accept this will have clouded my judgement on them, though I'd like to think I've been pretty fair at assessing it - even if my opinions are to the chagrin of others!

PetrolDave wrote:
I've owned many small cars in my earlier years including 2 real Minis. The 107/C1/Aygo shares many things in common with them including several you mention - such as engine not wanting to fully rev (but a K&N filter helps a lot), strange seating position and rock hard ride (I drive my C1 just like I drove my Minis - avoid every pothole you can).
The body roll is IMHO typically French, and the very light steering is actually what most car drivers nowadays want (when I worked at Lotus we resisted putting power steering on until it became a major factor in losing sales).


Never had the pleasure of driving a proper Mini, would love to though as they have a properly sorted chassis. Incredible considering the budget they were built to, almost like a happy accident as it certainly wasn't at the forefront of the designers minds.
Yes, light steering really is becoming a pandemic. Test drove a few 16-18 plate Auris' and Yari's with my partner, could not get used to it at all - just like in the Pug. It's a real shame, though not overly surprising as most people view a car as a tool these days and would rather surrender as much control and feel as possible.

Don't suppose you have an interesting Lotus stories? An Esprit has been a dream car of mine since 2003 (I was 10 and playing the original Need for Speed) - not the Giugiaro ones though, gotta be X180 or S4 for me as I just prefer the looks. I also simply must get in an S1 Elise at some point, heard so many good things about them.

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2006 Peugeot 107 1.0 (Soon to be daily!)


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2019 8:56 am 
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Cookeh wrote:
Don't suppose you have an interesting Lotus stories? An Esprit has been a dream car of mine since 2003 (I was 10 and playing the original Need for Speed) - not the Giugiaro ones though, gotta be X180 or S4 for me as I just prefer the looks. I also simply must get in an S1 Elise at some point, heard so many good things about them.


Most of what we did is covered by NDA, but my best memory is being allowed to drive a show car fitted with a twin turbo V8 version of the original Corvette ZR1 engine which was insured for several million pounds - it was an absolute beast even on the test track.

Second best was driving a prototype (that never made it to production) Ford Fiesta fitted with an Orbital two stroke engine - the torque was incredible for such a tiny engine, there was almost no need for a gearbox.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2019 8:55 pm 
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A few things have been done over the last 4000 miles of misery in this ecobox, so it's a slightly longer post.

I managed to get home slightly early one day day so I thought I'd look into a brake squeal that was developing a few weeks ago. I initially expected pads as whilst the current ones are only 18 months or around 12000mi old they were Bargain Basement Eichers, so I grabbed a new set from ECP during their (eternal) sale.

Don't you just love it when a simple 30 minute job of changing brake pads turns into a 4 hour farce? I attribute all of this, every single second of delay, to trivial cost-cutting and bad design. Obviously, the first step in brake pad change is to jack the car up and get the wheels off. I'm not going to complain about the silly crease jacking point that inevitably gets bent by every garage who throw it on a lift or just use a flat jack pad - promise. I am definitely going to complain about having to use a 4ft breaker bar to get the lug nuts loose though, that sucked. God bless lazy fitters with air impact guns...!

Anyway, car was up, bolts were loose, but would the wheel come off? Would it hell.
Okay, fair enough common problem. I'll just give it a bit of a lovetap at 3 and 9 and it will pop free? Nope.
Okay, rubber mallet? Nope.
Hmm, righto, swift kicks to to top of the wheel then? Nope.
WD40 and a repeat of the above? Nope.
2x4 and 5lb lump hammer from the back of the wheel? Nope.
Dropping it from the max jack height with nuts loosened? Yeah, no.
Driving it down the street with nuts loosened? Nope (and stupid).

Impressive, right? Who said the French surrender easily?! :D After an hour and a half I gave up (now who's the surrender monkey) and took it to my local garage who spent the next 30 minutes using an acetylene torch on the mating lip. Even after that it took some serious hits from a 10lb hammer to break them free. With them free I was quite surprised to see that beyond the usual corrosion mating the lip on the hub to the steel wheel, the hub had also mated itself with the back of the steel which was contributing to the sticking.

At this point I made use of their airtools to clean the hub, inner face of the wheel and that mating lip up. To be honest I had to, couldn't get the wheel to sit back flush on the hub the corrosion was that bad. The mating surfaces then got slavered in coppaslip to hopefully prevent that happening again any time soon. So, 2 hours to remove two wheels, magnificent. Would have been a proper pain in the rear if, say, I'd gotten a flat...luckily for me that came later...:mad:

Image

You can still just about see the places the steelie had welded itself to the hub with corrosion. Eagle eyed will also notice the disk retaining screw is missing, need to find one of those.

So back at home and, onto the actual job at hand then. Internet says the caliper bolts are 13mm. I suppose they might have been once, but when I got to them they had so much corrosion on them that the 14mm head barely got on them. Broke out my rotary tool and wire wheeled them for a good little while until they started looking like a hexagon again. In their self-defense, once cleaned up, they functioned as they were meant to.

The caliper slider pins however, decided now was a good time to act up. Turns out corrosion on the caliper meant that the flat section of the slider pins was not sitting in the groove it was meant to, and so nothing stopped it spinning freely when turning the caliper bolt. Channel locks to the rescue, and the bolt came loose.

Image

Here's the old pads and hardware. The squeal could be explained by those crusty shims, the shims being partially detached/moved, or by the rusty hardware prevent the pads from moving easily. Surprisingly my initial expectation of low pad material was wrong, with 3.5mm or so left. Still, that's hardly a lot and I can't live with a squeal so in the bin they went.

Image

Yet more corrosion found where the hardware sits. Also a possible contributor - a definite contributor to a sticky brake on the nearside though. Wire brushed, then wheeled, and the new hardware installed:

Image

PSA: Always buy new hardware. Costs what, £4-5 on sale at places like ECP? Saves a lot of hassle and improves longevity.

Image

Standard, expected, new v old.

Image

More corrosion, pot was terrible. Now, this is entirely down to rubbish design. With pads installed the pad sits slightly lower than the top of the pot (you can see this in the pic with the old pads, look at where the circle of the piston pot sits). This means it is permanently exposed to water/dirt/crap - especially the caliper being mounted facing the front of the car. Genius PSA, genius. Wire wheeled, a bit of ceratec (if to do nothing but try and stop it welding itself to the shim).

With those installed, all I had to do was install the new bolts (14mm this time, odd) and repeat on the other side. Other side was slightly better, no issues with spinning slider bolts this time so this side actually took the expected 15 minutes or less.

At this point I decided to tackle another example of cost-cutting that had started to become a real eyesore. The mudguards. For whatever reason, in their infinite infallible wisdom, PSA decided to make the mounting bracket for the mudguards from metal - but not just any metal, 1.5mm thick (apparently) mild steel which was seemingly then not given any sort of protection...Smashing.

A few months (let alone a decade) later, where once you had a shiny clean mudguard bracket you now have this:

Image

Best part is, its an entirely visible part - it is not hidden or masked in any way whatsoever and has a real tendency to catch your (my) eye. I couldn't wire wheel it, as it would just vanish, can't replace it, and I couldn't even remove it as the bloody screws securing it had stripped. So, what was the next best... yes okay, the next cheapest and laziest method? Wire brush and some Hammerite.

Image

Got another coat after this pic, and will probably get another next time I'm working on the lemon. Definitely better, not as much of an eyesore. Should really have done the retaining clips and the other screw shouldn't it? Ah well, did I mention it was a lazy approach? :D

With what limited time I had left I decided to clean the windows. Now that we have a bit of sunlight in the afternoons I'd noticed that the front screen was deplorable. Covered in smudge marks and water spots....yes, really. When this heap suffers a leaky boot in winter it actually gets a frozen windscreen on the inside too (will have to find an old vid my sis sent). That, combined with no a/c, meant lots and lots of water spots. Here is the result from just the front windscreen - you don't even want to see what the rear window side looked like once all the dog nose-art had been eradicated.

Image

A 30-minute job turned into 4 hours because of cost-cutting and crap design. Oh, and the flat thing I made a jibe at earlier? Happened on the way home from some errands, at least the wheel came off this time! Hooray.
__________

So after treating the garbage can to some maintenance and a good clean, it repaid me by developing a bit of a backfire and a rattly exhaust that slowly evolved into a boy racer's wet dream loud enough to require turning the stereo up to 90% to match its volume.

Got home, jacked it up, and immediately saw the problem...

ImageYummy hole

Shocked at how quickly that appeared to be honest, literally over the course of one day or around 60 miles. The original back box fell off on the motorway 5 years ago, this is a cheap (£42 fitted according to the receipt) backbox/silencer made in the UK. 5 years from something that cheap is pretty impressive though!

Whilst down there I noticed that there are quite a few rusty appendages on the bottom of this car. The exhaust bracket is looking pretty bad and is definitely going to require a stiff wire brush and some paint:

ImageTasty rust

Furthermore, the centre-section is looking a bit crusty. Not holed or anything, so probably only going to replace the back box and silencer tbh. Car is meant to be saving me money after all...pahaha.

ImageDelicious centre section

I took a trip to ECP during one of their sales and grabbed a Klarius backbox and new v-clamp for around £45. Not a bad price, actually - and a good quality part.

ImageZorst in boot

After jacking the car up I tried to unbolt the old v-clamp, penetrating fluid and the longest chain of spanners I could fit in the limited space... I definitely need to find a jack with a higher max height! Those attempts were fruitless, so I broke out my latest toy - a propane blowtorch. Sadly, this didn't help so I had to resort to using a hacksaw blade to cut the bolt off. After sawing through it (took a while given the limited range of movement :()I gave the clamp a bit of a love tap and the bolt dropped out, then a bit of poking with a flathead screwdriver to break away some of the rust and it is out with the old.

ImageJacked
ImageV-band during
ImageWoeful v-band

Getting the old exhaust out of the rubber hangers was quite a bit tricker than I anticipated as the old exhaust had flanged tips to the hangers. Lots of lube and some twisting (oooooh, matron!) of the rubber and they did eventually give. Naturally installing the new exhaust was much easier, just slipped in and bolted right up:

ImageNew v-band
ImageNew zorst on

New exhaust really shows up how scaly the centre section is, but given it is not leaking or holed I am not inclined to replace it - not when the purpose of the car is to save money (pahaha). Oh, and yes I did remove the sticker! With the old exhaust off we could give it a more in-depth perusal. Obviously, it was not good:

ImageExhaust rust
ImageExhaust rust

So, a relatively quick and easy job that saved my sanity. It was also my first time doing exhaust work, about as easy as expected difficulty wise - and pain in the **** wise too given the amount of spray and salt the bolts get exposed to. Unfortunately, I didn't have time to do anything about the exhaust hanger mount pictured - still must do something to address that.
___________

The engine bay was grim. Not a huge space to get filthy or any huge vents/scoops/grilles to allow dirt in so it's far from the worst in the world, but it needed a spruce up all the same. Here's what I was working with:

ImageBay before
ImageBay before 1
ImageBonnet before

This was far from any real sort of detailing - didn't even bother removing the airbox to get at the head, mainly just to get it looking presentable and so your hands didn't become black from simply checking the oil. I first removed the battery to give it and the tray/fuse box a proper clean, then wrapped terminals, vulnerable connectors, and the alternator in cling film to protect them. The fuse box is sealed so not worth worrying about, and the location of the air intake means it is also not worth protecting - if yours is in a location that water could ingress into then just block it or wrap it in a bag or clingfilm. I also tend to cover the top of the engine when cleaning under the bonnet too, just to reduce the volume of water entering the engine bay, and to reduce the amount of standing water.

ImagePrewash prep
ImageBag during

As for the process of cleaning, Use a strong APC, degreaser or traffic film remover of your choice (I used Power Maxed TFR @20:1 - it's cracking stuff). I applied it liberally, let it dwell, then agitated it with a wheel brush (great for tight areas and down the side of the strut towers/engine) and a detailing brush. Then I just rinsed it off with a hose, dried off the standing water with some old cloths, put the battery back in and let it idle for 5 mins to dry the rest of the bay. Then I dressed the hoses and plastics with Autoglym Vinyl Rubber Treatment and gave any metal surfaces a quick wipe over with some wire wool. Took about 30 mins total, and then naturally it poured with rain, preventing me from getting on with the exterior.

ImageBay after
ImageBay after 1
ImageBay after 2
ImageBay after 3
ImageBonnet after

I also noticed a few fraying fibres in the cloth seats, so just trimmed those off with some scissors to make it a bit more presentable.

ImageSeat before trim
ImageSeat after trim

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2006 Peugeot 107 1.0 (Soon to be daily!)


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 17, 2019 10:51 am 
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Well done! I'm amazed how good the engine compartment turned out.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2019 7:34 am 
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Well done with the good job! Good read too :)


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2019 4:53 pm 
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Thanks, both.

Fredrik M wrote:
Well done! I'm amazed how good the engine compartment turned out.


A good degreaser makes the whole process really very easy. As does the relative lack of stuff in the bay - there is not a whole load of pipes and components floating around everywhere.

______

Finally, finally, finally got around to doing something about the wheels. Hardly an OEM finish but a significant improvement all the same. I bought some wheel trims from Halfords for a grand total of £21, and a few tins of satin black paint for the OE look. So they got a wash, a quick sand down, primed and then a couple of coats of base. I got lucky in that there was zero wind so I didn't have to overly concern myself with overspray.

ImageMid-spray
ImagePost-spray
ImageFS NSF

Next, I decided to do something about the decidedly oxidised and flat looking paint on the bonnet. Other panels had faded, but not oxidised so this was not only the worst looking but also, sadly, the only one I could restore the colour of. Being the pug it was also the perfect car for me to use a DA for the first time on - with very little concern over any damage or marring/holograms/whatever. Thankfully it all went smoothly and has built up my confidence sufficiently for me to take the DA to my 850 soon.

I'm sure previous pics highlight the lack of any sort of lustre on the bonnet, so I decided to use the M105/205 combo on an Orange/White pad (respectively)....mainly because that's what came with my DasPro 6 V2 haha. I did not have any tape so the 50/50 is not quite as dramatic as it could be (who doesn't love a good 50/50), but I feel it does still highlight the improvement in gloss and correction.

ImageBonnet 50/50ish
ImageFS Front

And that is likely to be the last update for this car (minus a link to a listing perhaps), as it is now up for sale. Insurance renewal quotes for this thing are coming in at literally double what my 850 T5 is costing, which combined with maintenance costs and my ever diminishing will-to-live driving it makes it unviable as a second car. Those costs almost entirely offset any fuel savings, especially now the additional 12k mi that I was expecting this year are no longer a consideration.

Here are the pics from the sale ad that I am currently in the process of writing:

ImageFS Boot by Cookeh_, on Flickr
ImageFS Rear Int by Cookeh_, on Flickr
[url=https://flic.kr/p/2ggfWSr]ImageFS Rear Bench by Cookeh_, on Flickr
ImageFS Console by Cookeh_, on Flickr
ImageFS Front Int by Cookeh_, on Flickr
ImageFS Bay by Cookeh_, on Flickr
ImageFS Front by Cookeh_, on Flickr
ImageFS OSF by Cookeh_, on Flickr
ImageFS OS by Cookeh_, on Flickr
ImageFS OSR by Cookeh_, on Flickr
ImageFS Rear by Cookeh_, on Flickr
ImageFS NSR by Cookeh_, on Flickr
ImageFS NS by Cookeh_, on Flickr
ImageFS NSF by Cookeh_, on Flickr

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